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Net manuals.

Definition of Net and others

Net (network) – generic top-level domain (gTLD) used on the Internet's Domain Name System. The net gTLD is currently operated by VeriSign. Registrations are processed via accredited registrars and internationalized domain names are also accepted.
TCP/IP – the suite of communications protocols used to connect hosts on the Internet. TCP/IP uses combines the TCP and IP protocols to provide addressing and reliable data transfer for a variety of other Internet protocols, including HTTP, FTP and SMTP.
 

Legends

  xxxKb = Size of downloadable file in Kb  || - Manual on Internet (no downloadable)
- Htm Format |  - Microsoft Word (.doc) | - Acrobat PDF (.pdf)  | - Rich Format Text (.rtf) |  | - Unformatted text (.txt)
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Manual Description Online Format File

    


Introduction to TCP/IP Summary: TCP and IP were developed by a Department of Defense (DOD) research project to connect a number different networks designed by different vendors into a network of networks (the "Internet"). It was initially successful because it delivered a few basic services that everyone needs (file transfer, electronic mail, remote logon) across a very large number of client and server systems. Several computers in a small department can use TCP/IP (along with other protocols) on a single LAN. The IP component provides routing from the department to the enterprise network, then to regional networks, and finally to the global Internet. On the battlefield a communications network will sustain damage, so the DOD designed TCP/IP to be robust and automatically recover from any node or phone line failure. This design allows the construction of very large networks with less central management. However, because of the automatic recovery, network problems can go undiagnosed and uncorrected for long periods of time.
 
 
Introduction to TCP/IP This mini-tutorial provides a general overview of TCP, and is not specific to the SSF implementation.

Table of Contents
TCP Summary
TCP Header
TCP State Transition Diagram
Sliding Window
Adaptive Retransmission
Congestion Control


 
 
The Internetwork Protocol (IP) The IP (Internet Protocol) is a protocol that uses datagrams to communicate over a packet-switched network. The IP protocol operates at the network layer protocol of the OSI reference model and is a part of a suite of protocols known as TCP/IP. Today, with over 1.5 billion users worldwide, the current Internet is a great success in terms of connecting people and communities. Even though the current Internet continues to work and is capable of fulfilling its current missions, it also suffers from a relative “ossification”, a condition where technological innovation meets natural resistance, as exemplified by the current lack of wide deployment of technologies such as multicast or Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6).
 
 
         

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